A short while back during our 2016 Summer Meetup I shared what I thought was an interesting idea with the team here at DNSimple. A few months later I'm excited that I get to share that idea with you as well.

I'd like to direct your attention to the newest member of the DNSimple subdomain family: study.dnsimple.com! The DNStudy, as it were, is a place where our team will post learning resources we love. These resources can take the form of slide decks, videos, blog posts, tools…basically anything that we can personally vouch for as a good use of time for anyone curious to learn more about a given subject.

Our team is made up of some awesome people who have given their fair share of conference talks. Initially the idea was to have a corner of our site where we could aggregate all of the slide decks, videos, or other types of content that our team has created over the years. Though we quickly realized that we'd like to be able to share anything we believe is useful, not solely the things that we've created ourselves. As such, the things you see in the DNStudy will be a mixed bag of content created by our team, as well as our favorite resources from the rest of the internet.

You learn a lot from each company you work for, but that knowledge doesn't just appear out of nowhere. As we learn, we find repositories of information that help us get to some level of understanding of a certain subject. Think about how you came to find some of your favorite things that taught you something. Were they the first result of your first attempt at a Google search? If you're anything like me, no. My favorite resources all required research of their own. Googling "UX principles", for example, will give you a seemingly infinate number of books, blogs, apps, forums, and textbooks related to the subject. It can take hours just to decide on what book you want to read. It can be a cumbersome process that comes with a few obsticles as well; such as trying to figure out what of the information available to you is actually still valid, perhaps it's outdated or since been deprecated.

I've gone through that process probably ten thousand times, and I've found some real gems as a result. At some point I realized that everyone else probably does the same thing in one way or another, and that they probably have gems of their own. If I wanted to learn about some of the lower-level details about DNS, for example, what better way to figure out where to start than by going to a DNS provider's website and looking at the resources they themselves used to learn (shameless plug) how dns works.

That's just one example, our content will not focus around DNS. Because while we do know quite a lot about it, we've also all learned a lot more while working here. Equally as important as our knowledge of the space we're in, we need to know a lot about the tools and services we use to support our business. These are tools being used by thousands of other developers or software enthusiasts out there, all of which will have their own use cases and periods of learning to go with them. Our hope is that we can provide you with a place where you can skip the anxiety of not knowing where to start, and safely pick something up and start reading it knowing that the information in there has been vouched for.

I hope you enjoy DNStudy!