Last week I was at code.talks, a big language-agnostic conference right in my hometown of Hamburg. When such a large event is happening in front of your own doorstep there is no good reason to miss it. I also enjoy the opportunity to stay in touch with the local development community.

Funny enough, the very first code.talks (back then it was named developer conference) was also my very first conference. I've met people that still inspire me today, and I returned to the second edition of the event as a speaker. Since then, I've been lucky enough to get back on stage and share knowledge and excitement with the German development community.

Here is a quick recap of my highlights of the conference.

First off, not an actual highlight but worth mentioning, is my talk about web protocols. I was on the very first day in the very first spot. After some slight technical bumps at the beginning, it was a fun talk to give. If you saw it, let me know if you liked it. Here are the slides in case you missed the chance to attend. There will be a recording of the talk provided by the conference later.

My next highlight was Mike '@sperbsen' Sperber at the end of the first day, with his talk about Monads including code examples in Haskell and dead or alive animals on a highway in Texas. I really enjoyed the delivery of his presentation. It was very entertaining, he managed to avoid every single English term - that was pretty impressive to me. As I missed the chance to meet him later, I'm still not sure if it was very well done satire or not.

For the next highlight, I had to wait almost until the end of the next day. My friend Henning Schwentner did a talk on Domain Driven Design with a beautiful slide deck, which I've embedded below.

Henning provided a brief introduction into DDD and also discussed and clarified the most critical terms you need to know. His talk was also in German and he even translated the DDD book into German. It's not a DDD talk without the mention of ubiquitous language and bounded contexts. Henning managed to embed them both in very well picked example of cargo ships in the port of Hamburg.

Overall it was nice to meet and connect with the local development community, especially as I just started to work remotely and this in-person time is very important when you are all on your own on a regular work day. A cinema is an amazing place to have a conference. Super comfy seats, nachos, and all-you-can-carry popcorn is not something you see at every conference. If I can make a wish for code.talks 2018, it would be to have better coffee, but regardless, I look forward to next year's event to once again connect with the Hamburg development community.